A few days ago, I wrote a post at Futsalmagasinet, Sweden’s largest portal for futsal news, about the issues that arise when we educate coaches and players in futsal.

This text has been shared by many people and can be read here for those who are interested: http://www.futsalmagasinet.se/2017/06/14/futsalen-har-en-daddy-issue/

My headline in the text is that we often sell in how futsal could provide football players and coaches in their development. The problem with this kind of sales is that it will be a one-sided story and that futsal will be seen as a tool for creating better football players. That the sport would have its own value seems to be non-existent.

This is noticeable in much of the material coming from both FIFA and UEFA. It’s not uncommon with quotes like this from pro players: “thanks to futsal, I became the world player I’m today”. Of course fun for them, but would you imagine the reverse? “If I had not played football I would never have been a successful futsal player.” An stupid opinion for many, which further proves that the futsal for many people is just considered to be a tool for creating football players, not an own sport. This prevents the development of futsal on both long and short term.

Some time ago, I received additional water on my mill when I read UEFA Direct # 168, a publication that UEFA publishes. In this issue, the focus was on futsal, which you can read about here:

http://www.uefa.org/about-uefa/news/newsid=2476815.html

Of course fun that the futsal is noted, but as you may have understood, there is a con. Several times in the magazine, it is described how futsal is a tool for creating good football players and that it is mainly because of that reason why futsal exists.

Below are a few examples from page 22 of this issue that further strengthen my thesis.

It may seem small of me to remark on these words, but I have a strong belief that words affect how we think and look at things. It is of course very good that UEFA properly gives futsal a lot of space, but it must also be done right. As we use these word choices and formulas to describe futsal, it will be a one-sided story where futsal is subordinate to football. It’s problematic that we describe futsal as a tool to create footballers. Futsal is not a training method to create footballers, it is an own sport.

Misunderstand me correctly here.

I think it’s great that UEFA and FIFA give futsal more attention and of course football players can benefit from training futsal. But that does not mean it’s okay to have educations that puts the emphasis on creating good footballers instead of doing both. Or that we sell in futsal to coaches because it’s a good method of developing football players, instead of pointing out that it’s a sport that some actually prefer instead of football. Like me, for example.

A lot of thing is done well and going in the right direction, but many things can still be better.

No matter what many consider, futsal is a sport of its own, with its own rules and tactics. It is a sport that has many similarities to football, but also many differences that are important to pay attention to. Above all, it is important to make no valuation in any of those preferred from federal associations because UEFA and FIFA represent both football and futsal. Football is not futsal’s father, they are siblings who can coexist and learn from each other. That is my definite view.

Some children do not dream of becoming a new Ronaldo, some want to be the new Ricardinho.

Let them have a dream of being that without adding value to it.

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